Festival Days

While each religion has it’s own specific days associated with worship, there are some universal days that are celebrated in the Edeldale.

BRIGHTFEAST – Origin; Davanic worship
On the First day of Lightsong, a festival celebrating the light returning to the world is held across every major holding. From the highest lord to the lowest born, each family lights a multitude of white candles (in lieu of any magical lighting, torches or lamplight) at sundown and partakes in a meal of four courses; the Bland, the Bright, the Hot and the Tepid. This represents coming from darkness to light, the brightness of the sun (or Dava’s countenance), the warmth of the sun, and a reminder what it is to be without it.

Traditionally the meal begins with a type of round bread (davanloaf), followed by a lightly spiced meal (varies by culture), followed by peppers and a cold soup. At the end of the meal, candles are all extinguished and generally, the darkness of the night is filled with quiet song.

CHAMPION’S WEEK – Origin; Spectacle of the Many Tribes
In further days, the Spearfolk were more autonomous, but lived closely together. Each tribe would elect a champion to compete in what they referred to as “The Spectacle”; a massive series of games and contests to determine the Champion of the Folk. The festival usually begins on the 16th of Newgraze, but over the years has been held at different times due to war or tragedy. In any case, it’s always begins and ends on a Chorseday.

During the week, in memory of the original spectacle, there are contests of strength, games of skill and in the more urban areas, tournaments of magic and wit. During the week, several events will be hosted and culminates on the following Choresday. Champions may hold temporary title, be awarded a great prize or just retain the title and status of Champion until the following year. In all cases, the Champion is given some red mark or article of clothing to show their status.

DRAGONSBLOODOrigin; Herras’ slaying of the last red dragon
In the spirit of Champion’s Week, on the 30th of Newgraze is Dragonsblood (or Dragon’s Eve in some communities). On that night there are reenactments of Herras’ deeds. Children often wear dragon masks and attempt to scare adults (who usually laughingly comply). The festival usually is a night of great boasting and tale telling. At the end of the evening, a large bull’s heart is served and an effigy of the King (or in the case of Glimring, the King himself) is spattered with blood.

THE NIGHT OF HARD BISCUITS – Origin; The Dwarves entry into Edeldale
It is said that all the best brews mature by the month of Lightsong. So on any given Settlesday of that month a city, community or even a humble Dwarven outpost, hosts a NIGHT OF HARD BISCUITS (Sometimes called “Toast’s Night” and other times, just “Biscuits”). The timing varies, as rumor has it, because the ancient kings didn’t want ALL of their vassals to be incapacitated by drink in a single evening. So it was decreed that each region or village would be authorized to have a night of drunken revelry in accordance with a set schedule.

The name of the event dates back to Men’s first encounter with the Dwarves. They exchanged goods and cursed the almost rock-like biscuits the Dwarves gave in trade. That was until the first or Uli’s envoys came down from the mountain to drink and the humans realized that the the biscuits were in fact, designed to only be eaten after being dunked into heavy Dwarven stout. While the two peoples had previous a very formal and indifferent relationship, this drunken feast fostered immense goodwill and was responsible for the alliance the Dwarves and Men now have.

GRANDFEASTOrigin; farm tradition and possibly, Aerthan tradition
At or near the end of harvest, a great feast begins on Choresday through Settlesday. The actual timing is based on the the amount of harvest taken in. But this three day festival features agrarian tokens and traditions. No matter how poor, each community contributes a portion of the harvest to this event. In some towns it may be little more than three days of donated goods to be redistributed among the farmers. But in larger towns and cities it’s 3 nights of bountiful eating and drinking. There are songs that date back hundreds of years, showing of livestock and sharing of rustic traditions.

While it’s just considered a great culinary event in the cities, most who worship Aerthas, treat this as a festival of Thanks and end the evening of Settlesday in prayer and worship.

[more to come]

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