Longbridge – Inns and Pubs

 

INNS (licensed to charge overnight guests):

LongbridgeANTIQUEMAP

Woodfriend’s Inn:

One of the first large inns licensed in Longbridge, this well worn established building is home away from home for many a northern barbarian who travelled into the city. It has a large common room filled with a variety of stuffed beasts.

Tinker’s Timepiece:

A newer establishment, this was owned by a gnome until his untimely disappearance only recently. It’s currently in the hands of the local craftsmen’s guild, but is up for sale. The accommodations are small but comfortable and there are a number of upgrades worth the price (indoor plumbing for one).

Song Stone:

There’s no question this common room is the most packed of any city inn, mostly because it draws a large number of famous performers. It’s tall stone walls stand out among the other buildings around it and it’s not cheap, but travelers say it’s worth the coin.

Traveler House:

This average priced inn is a favorite among merchants and other travelers due to it’s covered stable for horses. It’s common room is cramped, but most prefer to cross the street to get their drinks and food at the Mariner’s Roost.

Lord’s Watch:

Subsidized by the Lord Longbridge, this expensive and nearly exclusive inn caters to the rich who visit the city. It has a full stable and mews with handlers, the finest dining in the area and provides 24 hour security to it’s guests. It even has private rooms for longer term rental.

Netmender’s Inn:

When Dwarves ride out of Firdeng hauling goods on the barges, they tend to stay at Netmender’s. It’s an old inn, one of the first in the city, and has fallen into disrepair, but it is cheap by comparison to the other inns.

PUBS (licensed to sell food and drink):

The Portly Pieman:

Just outside the Market Gate on the SW bank of the Strongwater, this pub isn’t technically inside the city’s limits, but serves so many of it’s locals it’s counted among the number of Longbridge pubs.

Mariner’s Roost:

Sporting a large, open porch overlooking the river and city beyond, Mariner’s Roost is quite popular in the warmer months. It has a friendly staff and is used to the rowdy sailors that frequent it’s walls.

The Flying Tome:

A quiet, cramped and smoky pub, this establishment is the drinking place for scholars, wizards and any who call the District Arcantis their home. A number of cantrips are always in effect here and can startle the uninitiated.

The Trout in Amber:

A small, almost non-descript bar at the back of Fishermen’s Alley, this small, rough hewn bar has a fine number of spirits and is an excellent source of rumors. It’s also the haunt of several of the smaller folk.

Iron Fists:

A large, spartan bar that occasionally sponsors fights in its large, recessed common area. It is the local favorite of soldiers, diplomats and anyone looking for muscle. It’s a safe enough pub, but it’s barfights are legendarily bloody.

The Clever Quail:

A quiet but bustling pub with a good menu. It’s location makes it prime for the more affluent in the area, but it doesn’t necessarily cater to them. Any hour it’s open you may see sailors mingling with bankers, sorcerers mingling with diplomats.

Banker’s Folly:

Once a shrine, this pub has drawn the ire of the temple district, since it’s just off of Pilgrim’s alley. While it doesn’t serve hard spirits, it’s trying to fend off the bad feelings of it’s neighbors by providing sacramental wine and beer to the members of the temple nearby.

Coin and Anchor:

A classic public house frequented by many. It’s afternoon pies are what most remember but it also has it’s own beer, crafted in Firdeng by Dwarven brewers. Most recent incursions of “Thunderbrew” from Greenfields has stirred up a bit of ill will.

Serpent’s Sail:

Little more than a fish & chips stand that serves ale. It’s selection is limited, it’s open to the elements and smells of old fish, but the sailors who frequent it swear by the price.

The Drunken Otter:

This busy place was most recently a den of thieves. Illegal gambling and other nefarious activities were prevalent.  And the clientele could sniff out new blood almost immediately.  However, after a brave intervention of a group of Dwarves and Halflings of Greenfields, the ‘Otter may be making a turn around. Added to their taps is the local favorite “Thunderbrew”, a heavy dwarven stout which is gaining popularity quickly.

Longbridge Public House:

One of the oldest pubs in the city, this sits on the original trading post when furriers came down from the barbarian lands. It spans the distance between Westbridge Street and Five Hearts Way in a massive building. It’s long tables can accommodate large groups and it’s meals are always served family style.

Mask & Heart:

An up and coming pub, this was built by the owners of the Song Stone to handle it’s overflow. While it doesn’t have the more famous talent, it has an open stage where anyone can play for 5 cp. Any tips are split with the house, but a talented musician or performer can make their money back quickly.

The Broken Needle:

Originally the site of the Tailor’s Guildhouse (absorbed into the craftsman’s guild) it has since been renovated and is popular amongst the guildsmen. It opens much earlier than the others in the area and serves a very hearty breakfast.

The Twisted Belt:

A rough and tumble place, the ‘Belt has a reputation for rough customers and even rougher staff. While the food is not much to talk about, they do have a porter imported from Goldring that cause many to risk the tough talk and danger that it might hold.

Barrel & Bucket:

Before leaving Marketwalk, almost every farmer, tinker or craftsman has a pint at the Barrel & Bucket before leaving Longbridge. It has a large outdoor area behind it which is filled with drinkers in the summers and firepits in the in the winter. It’s position on the Lower Walls affords it a view like no other.